HAVING COVID SYMPTOMS?

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF COVID-19?

 COVID-19 symptoms may appear 2 to 14 days after exposure to the virus and may include:

  • fever or chills
  • cough
  • shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • fatigue
  • muscle or body aches
  • headache
  • new loss of taste or smell
  • sore throat
  • congestion or runny nose
  • nausea or vomiting
  • diarrhea

WHAT IF I HAVE SOME OF THESE SYMPTOMS?

If you are experiencing one or more of these symptoms, call the County’s COVID-19 HEALTH LINE at 303-670-7528 to schedule a free COVID-19 test. Please note that tests are BY APPOINTMENT ONLY and appointments need to be made at least 24-hours prior to the testing date.

This is a message line only, please leave your name and phone number and a Public Health Nurse will call you back to conduct the brief screening (required by CDC) and to schedule your testing time. Messages are checked and returned regularly Monday through Friday from 8am to 4:30pm.

 If you are experiencing an emergency situation, call 911.

 WHO SHOULD GET TESTED?

 Anyone who: 

  • is experiencing one or more symptoms
  • has been in close contact with anyone who has tested positive for COVID-19
  • will be in close contact with members of the vulnerable population

Click here for more details and the current schedule for COVID-19 TESTING IN CLEAR CREEK COUNTY.  

 SHOULD I SELF-ISOLATE?

If you feel sick, you should stay in your home and self-isolate to the extent possible.  If you test positive for COVID-19, you will be required to isolate for two weeks.   If you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, you should quarantine by staying away from others as much as possible to prevent potential spread of the disease.

 Click here for ISOLATION INFORMATION.

 Click here for QUARANTINE INFORMATION. 

In any of these situations, you should have a “safety net” in place – a two-week supply of food, medication, and other essential items in your home so that you do not need to leave and potentially expose others to this highly contagious virus.   If possible, you should also coordinate with friends, family members and/or neighbors to help you with any other assistance you may need. 

 Click here for more information on LOCAL RESOURCES, including food, grocery shopping, housing, and mental health services.   For assistance in accessing these essentials, contact the County’s Public Health Emergency Preparedness Coordinator at 303-679-2307.

HOW DOES COVID-19 SPREAD?

The virus that causes COVID-19 primarily spreads from person-to-person. The virus is thought to spread mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. 

When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain a virus – COVID-19 or other viruses. If the person coughing or sneezing has the disease and you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the virus.  The droplets can also remain on surfaces that others touch and then spread by touching your face, other people, other objects, and so on.

Many people are asymptomatic, meaning they have the virus without even knowing it because they do not exhibit any symptoms.  This is why wearing a mask and social distancing in public are so important.   It is also very important to frequently and vigorously wash your hands with soap and water; as well as frequently disinfect public surfaces to kill any virus that might be present.

WHO IS AT RISK FOR CONTRACTING COVID-19?

Certain people will have an increased risk of infection:

  • People who have traveled to areas where widespread community transmission is occurring.
  • People who had direct close contact with someone who was confirmed to have COVID-19.

Some people are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19. That includes:

  • Older people (over age 60), especially those over 80 years.
  • People who have chronic medical conditions like heart, lung, or kidney disease, or diabetes.
  • Older people with chronic medical conditions are at greatest risk.

If you are within the higher risk population of becoming severely ill from COVID-19, Clear Creek County Public Health recommends that you have a have a “safety net” in place – a two-week supply of food, medication, and other essential items in your home so that you do not need to leave and potentially expose others to this highly contagious virus.  If possible, you should also coordinate with friends, family members and/or neighbors to help you with any other assistance you may need. 

 Click here for more information on LOCAL RESOURCES, including food, grocery shopping, housing, and mental health services.  For assistance in accessing these essentials, contact the County’s Public Health Emergency Preparedness Coordinator at 303-679-2307.

The CDC webpage for People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19. Provides additional information on how to plan and prepare for isolation and/or quarantine if you are at high risk.  

HOW DO I KNOW IF I WAS EXPOSED?

You generally need to be in close contact with a sick person to get infected. If you have not been in close contact with a sick person with COVID-19, you are considered to be at low risk for infection. Close contact includes:

  • Living in the same household as a sick person with COVID-19.
  • Caring for a sick person with COVID-19.
  • Being within 6 feet of a sick person with COVID-19 for at least 10 minutes.
  • Being in direct contact with fluids from a sick person with COVID-19. This includes being coughed on, kissing, sharing utensils, etc.

HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF?

At this time, there is no vaccine to protect against COVID-19 and no medications approved to treat it. 

There are, however, many ways you can reduce your chances of catching the virus and mitigate community spread of COVID-19.  We recommend people protect themselves and others by practicing these actions:

  • Wear a mask in public.
  • Practice social distancing. Keeping 6 feet of physical distance between all people at all times. The 6-foot rule does not apply to people who live in the same house as you -- in other words, your roommates and family.  But if you, your family, or your roommates get sick, you or they must self-isolate.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water. Ensure you are washing your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds.  You may also use alcohol-based hand sanitizers as long as the alcohol content is at least 60%.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing and sneezing, throw the tissue away and then wash your hands. Make sure you are coughing in to your sleeve and not your hands.
  • Avoid touching your face including your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces, like door knobs and your phone. Make sure the disinfectant you are using is listed on the EPA List N: Disinfectant List for Use Against SARS-CoV-2.
  • Avoid being around anyone with cold- or flu-like symptoms.
  • If you’re sick, stay home and away from public places.
  • Practice good food and safety techniques such as cooking and storing foods at the correct temperatures and handling food safely during preparation.
  • Make healthy lifestyle choices.  The healthier you are overall, the better your immune system will be at fighting off all viruses, including COVID-19
  • Get a flu shot.